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5 Benefits of Running

5 Benefits of Running

It’s no secret that working out can potentially extend your life and create a healthier lifestyle for you overall. What about running? How can running benefit you?

Whether it's a way to deal with stress or if you just run for pleasure, there are many health benefits that come along with running. In celebration of National Running Day, we have listed just a few of those benefits:

 

  • Bone Health

Running can cause a lot of stress on your bones. However, continuous running will force your bones to adjust and reform in order to better handle the stress.

It's important to keep up with your daily (or even weekly) running routine, even if you're only running for a short period of time. The repetitive training will allow your bones to adapt and become stronger; this can help prevent things like osteoporosis and bone loss.

 

  • Metabolism and Energy

After a run, it’s typical to feel more energized and alert; this is because physical activity increases your heart rate and blood flow. Running is also an effective way to boost your metabolism and burn calories.

 

  • Heart Health

When you run, you're strengthening your heart muscle. Consistent running can cause you to have a lower resting pulse rate which means your heart can perform its daily functions more easily.

Running can also lead to improvement in your blood circulation and potentially lead to less cardiac strain.

 

  • Blood Pressure

Exercise, in general, can help lower your blood pressure; it's typically most noticeable right after a workout.

If you have high blood pressure, it might be a good idea to work out or run in smaller sessions throughout the day to try to maintain good blood pressure.

 

  • Cholesterol

Moderate intensity running can be effective in increasing the “good” cholesterol in your body and decreasing the "bad" cholesterol. This, in turn, may reduce the risk of a stroke, heart attack, or coronary artery disease.

 

It's important to talk with your doctor before taking up any new exercise activity so they can advise you about what's right for you.